Jun 30

Haiku

Find a poem you like on the site. Click SPROUT and write a haiku based on the poem you just read. (A haiku has three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables, often capturing an image, feeling or moment.)

[YWP Photo Library; Photo by Shannon Ripp] 
 
Nov 10

Inspired

Find a piece of writing you like on YWP. Create a piece of art — a drawing, a photo, a painting, — based on that piece. Include a link to the piece that inspired you. (And send a comment to the author to let them know.)

[Photo Credit: YWP Photo Library, photo by Shannon Ripp]
Sep 27

On Commenting--Shorter Version

Sep 27

Editing Process

Editing and revising a piece can be one of the hardest parts of writing. Yet, it is one of the most important stages of writing. Here is a suggested process to help you organize yourself when editing. 

1. Read your piece to yourself to find big problems. 
       When editing, let yourself be the first set of eyes. ONLY look at big picture items. Things such as topic/theme consistency, relevancy, clarity, voice, tone, imagery, order, message, and length are often looked at in this stage. If you are writing a narrative, or if you have a person in your story, you'll often consider the person's voice or character consistency throughout. 
       This is the point where you will often cut sentences or paragraphs, change the order, rewrite entire sections of your piece, or change your wording to make your piece more clear. BIG things are happening.

2. Give your piece to a friend for feedback. 

Commenting -- Overview

Commenting -- or exchanging feedback -- is an important part of the Young Writers Project community. This is where you can learn the strengths and flaws of your work or where you can get, simply, some affirmation. The exchange of feedback builds community and, frankly, it's a motivation for you. We all like to get a little feedback; it helps us keep going. HINT: You are more likely to get a comment if you give a comment to someone else on their post.

On this site, you have four circles of commenting and response: