Sep 27
NewWriter2's picture

Basic Grammar: Words

An often very confusing part of writing is when to use what word and where to use it. More than once you've probably had someone tell you, "You said that wrong!" Here are a few common usage/grammar rules that often get mixed up by writers.

1. You and I vs. You and me. People have a hard time remembering which phrase you are supposed to say and when. To learn this rule, you just need to remember your subject pronouns and object pronouns. 

THE RULE: 
            The words "you" and "I" are what we call subject pronouns. These are the pronouns that perform an action. The words "you" (yes, it has two categories) and "me" are object pronouns. These are the pronouns that receive an action. Thus, you say "you and I" if the group is doing an action, and "you and me" if the group received an action. 

EXAMPLE: 
Sep 27
NewWriter2's picture

Details: Concrete vs. Abstract

We want our writing to feel genuine, and to connect with our readers to the point where they can visualize our words in their heads. A great way to learn to connect to readers through writing is by understanding the difference between concrete and abstract details. A concrete detail or image will help engage your readers by getting them to create a visual picture of your writing in their own minds.

Concrete vs Abstract. A concrete detail/image is one that is grounded in a tangible idea, example and/or description; a concrete detail is sometimes referred to as a specific detail and often it is also a sensory detail. An abstract detail/image has language and examples that are conceptual and have multiple interpretations. 
Examples: 
        Concrete: The plant just barely brushed the bottom of my knee; its flower was broad as my face, and its stem as thick as my pinky.